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RULE 35—(g) (H) (i) and (j)

(g) A vessel at anchor shall at intervals of not more than one minutering the bell rapidly for about 5 seconds. In a vessel of 100 meters ormore in length the bell shall be sounded in the forepart of the vesseland immediately after the ringing of the bell the gong shall be soundedrapidly for about 5 seconds in the after part of the vessel. A vesselat anchor may in addition sound three blasts in succession,namely one short, one prolonged and one short blast, to give warningof her position and of the possibility of collision to an approachingvessel.

(h) A vessel aground shall give the bell signal and if required thegong signal prescribed in paragraph (g) of this Rule and shall, in addition,give three separate and distinct strokes on the bell immediatelybefore and after the rapid ringing of the bell. A vessel aground may inaddition sound an appropriate whistle signal.

(i) A vessel of less than 12 meters in length shall not be obliged togive the above-mentioned signals but, if she does not, shall makesome other efficient sound signal at intervals of not more than 2 minutes.

(j) A pilot vessel when engaged on pilotage duty may in addition tothe signals prescribed in paragraphs (a), (b) or (g) of this Rule soundan identity signal consisting of four short blasts.

 

Januari 17, 2011 Posted by | rules 1972 | | Tinggalkan komentar

RULE 35 Sound Signals in Restricted Visibility

In or near an area of restricted visibility, whether by day or night, thesignals prescribed in this Rule shall be used as follows:

(a) A power-driven vessel making way through the water shallsound at intervals of not more than 2 minutes one prolonged blast.

(b) A power-driven vessel underway but stopped and making noway through the water shall sound at intervals of not more than 2minutes two prolonged blasts in succession with an interval of about2 seconds between them.

(c) A vessel not under command, a vessel restricted in her ability tomaneuver, a vessel constrained by her draft, a sailing vessel, a vesselengaged in fishing and a vessel engaged in towing or pushinganother vessel shall, instead of the signals prescribed in paragraphs(a) or (b) of this Rule, sound at intervals of not more than 2 minutesthree blasts in succession, namely one prolonged followed by twoshort blasts.

(d) A vessel engaged in fishing, when at anchor, and a vesselrestricted in her ability to maneuver when carrying out her work atanchor, shall instead of the signals prescribed in paragraph (g) of thisRule sound the signal prescribed in paragraph (c) of this Rule.

(e) A vessel towed or if more than one vessel is towed the last vesselof the tow, if manned, shall at intervals of not more than 2 minutessound four blasts in succession, namely one prolonged followed bythree short blasts. When practicable, this signal shall be made immediatelyafter the signal made by the towing vessel.

(f) When a pushing vessel and a vessel being pushed ahead arerigidly connected in a composite unit they shall be regarded as apower-driven vessel and shall give the signals prescribed in paragraphs(a) or (b) of this Rule.

 

 

Januari 17, 2011 Posted by | rules 1972 | | Tinggalkan komentar

RULE 27 (F)

A vessel engaged in mineclearance operations shall, in additionto the lights prescribed for a power-driven vessel in Rule 23 or to thelights or shape prescribed for a vessel at anchor in Rule 30 as appropriate,exhibit three all-round green lights or three balls. One of theselights or shapes shall be exhibited near the foremast head and oneat each end of the fore yard. These lights or shapes indicate that it isdangerous for another vessel to approach within 1000 meters of themineclearance vessel.Vessel

 

 

Januari 17, 2011 Posted by | rules 1972 | | Tinggalkan komentar

Safe Water Mark

Safe Water Mark, as defined by the International Association of Lighthouse Authorities, is asea mark used in maritime pilotage to indicate the end of a channel implying that open, deep and safe water lies ahead. The marker is also sometimes known as a Fairway Buoy.

It is recognisable by its red and white vertical stripes and commonly bears a top-sign in shape of a red ball. Lighted buoys flash morse code “A”.

In the United States, safe water marks have the initials of their associated waterways or localities printed on them.

Lighted buoy flashes morse code “T” (one long flash) with intervals of 6 seconds

 

Januari 17, 2011 Posted by | buoy | | Tinggalkan komentar

IALA buoyage System

Marks are distinguished by their colour, being red or green, and shape.

For historical reasons, two different schemes are in use worldwide, differing in their use of colour.
Previously there had been 30 different buoyage systems, prior to IALA introducing the rationalised system. In 1980 on a conference convened by IALA, they agreed to adopt the rules of a new combined system, which combined the previous two systems (A and B) into one system, with two regions (A and B).

The IALA defines them as Region A and Region B:

  • Region A comprises nations in Europe, Australia, New Zealand, parts of Africa and most ofAsia other than the Philippines, Japan and Korea.
  • Region B comprises nations in North America, Central America and South America, thePhilippines, Japan and Korea.

Region A

  • port marks are red and may have a red flashing light of any rhythm.
  • starboard marks are green and may have a green flashing light of any rhythm.

Lateral system a mark.PNG

Region B

  • port marks are green and may have a green flashing light of any rhythm.
  • starboard marks are red and may have a red flashing light of any rhythm.

Lateral system b mark.PNG

Both regions

  • port marks are square or have a flat top
  • starboard marks are conical (or present a triangular shape) or have a pointed top.

The shape is an important feature, as colours cannot be distinguished in some light conditions, or by persons with red-green colour blindness. Marks may also carry unique markings of letters and numbers; these may be used to identify the mark as one indicated on anautical chart. Likewise, a mark’s light may flash in a distinctive sequence for the same purpose.

Also defined in the lateral mark systems is a bifurcation mark, which has both red and green horizontal bands, one over the other. This mark indicates that a “preferred” channel (often, a deep channel suitable for heavy commercial traffic) lies to one side, and a secondary channel on the other. Vessels wishing to use the preferred channel observe the top colour of the mark, and vessels wishing to use the secondary channel observe the bottom colour.

In Region A only, the phrase “Is there any red port left?” (referring to the red colour of the fortified wine “port”) may be used as a mnemonic, indicating that a red mark must be kept on the left when “returning” to (i.e, entering) a harbour or river.

In Region B only, the phrase “red right returning” may be used as a mnemonic, indicating that a red mark must be kept on the right whenreturning to (i.e., entering) a harbour or river.

Januari 17, 2011 Posted by | buoy | | 1 Komentar

cardinal mark

cardinal mark is a sea mark (a buoy or other floating or fixed structure) used in maritime pilotage to indicate the position of a hazard and the direction of safe water.

Cardinal marks indicate the direction of safety as a cardinal (compass) direction (north, east, south or west) relative to the mark. This makes them meaningful regardless of the direction or position of the approaching vessel, in contrast to the (perhaps better-known) lateral mark system.

The characteristics and meanings of cardinal marks are as defined by theInternational Association of Lighthouse Authorities.

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Januari 17, 2011 Posted by | arsip lama | | Tinggalkan komentar